A letter about Africans Who Hate Themselves

After my prayers today, I dived into my personal emails. This particular email touched my heart for I am a solid believer of ONE BODY and have not been cognizant about the effect of racism. The few times I have been involved in these conversations,I always requested for more evidence, citing that words/actions must have been misinterpreted. We strive to lead by example and consistently advocate for inclusion, authentic leadership, leadership parity, power, gender balance advancement and political participation in public offices etc.

It is preposterous when racism is experienced amongst people. Racism often results in discrimination and prejudice towards people based on their race or ethnicity. Internalized racism can be defined as the internalization by people of racist attitudes towards members of their own ethnic group. Internalized racist attitudes in individuals present barriers towards achievement of racial equality. Question is why must anyone encounter any type of racism in 21st century?

Please read through and share your thoughts. This is a cry for help from a man who needs a system change.
Here is the letter I received today:

Dear Princess Halliday:
It is with great respect that I write you today. I do not know if you would pay attention to this or share this but please take a min and listen to this turmoil that has plagued our Nation for so long.

I am a graduate of Civil Engineering with a second class upper degree. I pride myself as one of the best. During my degree, professors, students refer to me as an expert in this field and over the years, my expertise has been proven in my work place. The reason I write you today is that with all my qualification and knowledge, I am still subjected as a subordinate to Lebanese men who have no adequate qualification or education from their hometown but for the color of their skin.I and my colleagues have been continuously placed in lower positions while the Lebanese men are placed in upper management as our bosses. 
It hurts Princess, it is painful to spend seven years( excluding years of strike and delays in African system of study) to properly get educated, spend so many years working and have people with no education placed ahead of you as bosses because of the color of their skin .
When will “we” start believing in ourselves and lifting each other up?Why do we hate ourselves and take pleasure in pulling each other down while believing in other races ? Why can’t we all be equal? When an expatriate is brought to Africa, we honor them, we flung out doors open and give them the best we have but we fail to honor our own who often times are capable of doing much more. The Government embraces other races and give billion dollar contracts to them because they are not Africans. The Government finds trust with other races, they respect and provide them with the best living conditions while we are subjected to slums by our own government- our own leaders.

Is there something we need to change? Have we completely lost confidence and trust in ourselves?
If we have, how do we build this back and have government, companies, organizations see that we are enough. We need to work together with all races, we need to be hired and placed in positions like the white based on knowledge and experience not the color of our skin.
I hope you share and use this during your speech across America. Please let the world know that racism and slavery also exist within our people. We truly are the problem.

Respectfully,
-Tony A-

A persons work capacity should not be determined by the color of his/her skin nor should anyone be treated unjustly because of the color of their skin.
-Princess Halliday-

Please share your thoughts. Perhaps your perspective can help strike more clarity.

Powerfully
-Princess Halliday-
B.Eng, MAL, QMHP, PhD(in-view)

7 Comments

  1. Lily January 26, 2018 at 6:15 pm - Reply

    As high as the so called experts are placed in Nigeria most of them are just mechanics ,warehouse keepers or even storekeepers in their own country,but Nigerian government choose to elevate them and reduce their own to subordinates, it’s truly a shame because in their country foreigners are not elevated this much, once they realize you have an accent they discriminate against you act like they don’t understand English all of a sudden,they are very unsociable and unfriendly when you are in thier country, The Nigerian government has to stop reducing their own people, and elevating foreigners in the name of experts they are really not experts most of them didn’t even complete high school . Neither do they have a four year college degree .
    An end has to be put on such act by the Nigerian government.

  2. Rodney January 26, 2018 at 11:03 pm - Reply

    I believe this is evident amongst Africans, hatred for one another and the desire to pull each other down. Africans constant desire to pull each other down rather than build each other and their economy. this is one reason why they seldom emerge great. Keep bringing up this awareness Princess Halliday. Thank you.

  3. Sophia Diop January 26, 2018 at 11:42 pm - Reply

    The first thing is to aknowledge all together that we have a problem ( not a minority).If we know which problem we have and we also know the the causes. I truly think that we have the solution.However, the issue here is that we tend to tackle the symptoms of the problem rather than the actual problem.

    In all honesty, our cultural and religious education also play a role in that matter.
    We tend to be patient and put everything in God’s hand, he only guides, give signs, strength and paths.God cannot come down to solve our issue.We have to take risk, stand up, react, be opinionated instead of complaining to those who bring us down.Taking risk can affect us today but help the generation to come.

    The other problem is that, we are not dealing here with leaders, which is an issue.
    Leadership is thought, but not followship.
    How to become a great leader without an history of great followship ? Followship help a great leader be in the shoes of the followers.

  4. Sophia Diop January 27, 2018 at 12:01 am - Reply

    The first thing is to aknowledge all together that we have a problem ( not a minority).If we know which problem we have and we also know the causes. I truly think that we have the solution.However, the issue here is that we tend to tackle the symptoms of the problem rather than the actual problem.

    In all honesty, our cultural and religious education also play a role in that matter.
    We tend to be patient and put everything in God’s hand, he only guides, give signs, strength and paths.God cannot come down to solve our issue.

    We have to take risk, stand up, react, be opinionated instead of complaining to those who bring us down.Taking risk can affect us today but help the generation to come.It is only when we will be ready to do the sacrifices needed, be ready to consequences such as losing our jobs for others while being the best to the point of being indispensable, irreplaceable that things will start changing.

    There is more fear than faith in the air.
    Although fear and faith cannot cohabite.
    Whether we push with faith or we abandon due to fear.

    The other problem is that, we are not dealing here with leaders, which is an issue.
    Leadership is thought, but not followship.
    How to become a great leader without an history of great followship ? Followship help a great leader be in the shoes of the followers.

  5. EB January 27, 2018 at 1:36 pm - Reply

    This may have nothing to do with racism but more to do with trust. The Lebanese man who owns a business may trust his fellow Lebanese better than Nigerians and this is only natural. He may also communicate better with his people because they understand themselves better.

    The Nigerian is hired to do a specific job. I suggest he does it well and ignore the sentiments. If he feels undervalued, he can approach his boss to renegotiate his terms. He also has an option to venture out himself.

    Again, I don’t believe the complaint as presented here is a racial issue. We may be mixing things up

    • Princess Halliday January 28, 2018 at 7:37 am - Reply

      Acknowledged and thank you so much Lily, Sophia Diop, Rodney and EB. Thank you for your insights.. Very well received. My team contacted the writer who further narrated that his company is owned by a Nigerian public official. As I evaluated his letter more, I believe one of his concern is that with the seasoned qualification they have garnered, they still are undervalued by the system. He shared his knowledge and specifics on how he believes they are undervalued.

      We reached out to more people working for this company and a few other similar companies, 99 percent of the employee population attested to being continuously undervalued by the system with people of low or no qualification as their bosses.

      Do you think the culture influences these actions?

  6. James Smith January 29, 2018 at 1:19 am - Reply

    We can and will eradicate racism and other forms of sickness in our lifetime.

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